Wed, July 16, 2014
Sherman's "Flying Column" at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain: Major General John M. Schofield and the 23rd Army Corps, 10 June - 10 July 1864

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All lectures are held in the multipurpose rooms of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The building opens at 6:30 p.m., the talk begins at 7:15 p.m., and the question period concludes around 8:30 p.m. All are welcome, and the event is free! For further information, please call 717-245-3972

July 16, 2014 (Wednesday)
Perspectives in Military History Lecture Series with Dr. Britt McCarley

Dr. Britt McCarley
Chief Historian, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

Lecture Date: July 16, 2014
Topic: "Sherman’s "Flying Column" at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain: Major General John M. Schofield and the 23rd Army Corps,
10 June - 10 July 1864"

By 1864, the battle weary and bloodied Confederate armies lacked the means to conquer the Union forces pushing into Southern territory. In response to the continued Northern aggression, Confederate leaders opted for a strategy of survival and attrition. The strategy required Richmond and Atlanta to redouble their defensive efforts in the face of a scorched earth offensive led by Major General William T. Sherman. Sherman’s objective was the annihilation of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of Tennessee and the capture of Atlanta. The campaign faltered at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain and might have stalled completely but for a daring flank attack. Dr. J. Britt McCarley of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) will give a lecture examining the brilliant maneuver based on his new book, The Atlanta and Savannah Campaigns, May-December 1864. Dr. McCarley will discuss Union Major General John M. Schofield’s successful and far-reaching envelopment of the eight-mile Confederate line and its critical strategic implications. Join Dr. McCarley and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) for an examination of how maneuver achieved more than battering-ram assaults on June 27, 1864.

Dr. J. Britt McCarley earned a Ph.D. from Temple University in 1989. After serving nine years as the TRADOC Field History Programs Chief, and 18 years overall in the Army History Program, Dr. McCarley was selected as TRADOC’s Chief Historian in June 2006. His first book, The Atlanta Campaign: a Civil War Driving Tour of Atlanta-area Battlefields, was published in 1989, and he has been published in several collections, such as Beyond Combat: Essays in Honor of Russell F. Weigley. Dr. McCarley also served as editor of Victory Starts Here: A Short 40-Year History of the US Army Training and Doctrine Command published in spring 2013.