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Small Wars 2.0
 
Three UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters land at an outpost in Northern Afghanistan. A congressionally-mandated panel found that the Quadrennial Defense Review did not project out far enough to prepare the military for the long term. (Photo: USAF Staff Sgt Lail)  

 

SMALL WARS 2.0: A WORKING PAPER ON
LAND FORCE PLANNING AFTER IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN

Mr. Nathan Freier
Visiting Research Professor
U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute

The views expressed in the document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, the U.S. Army War College, the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

 

SUMMARY

In this article, the author argues that as senior leaders visualize the future land force, three realities are relatively certain.

First, the force will be smaller - perhaps, significantly so.

Second, tomorrow's landpower demands will not look like those of either today or yesterday. And, finally,

Third, national leaders will hesitate when faced with future interventions that look - in cost and scale - like the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He then argues that how the land services and special operations forces account for these factors may determine how well they navigate senior-level defense decision making on the future joint force, and makes recommendations regarding how to approach the challenge.


To view this work, see document here



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This page last updated on 29 March 2011.

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