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FEATURED PUBLICATIONS
Mon, July 22, 2013
The essay is a superb analysis of how careerist impulses have obscured the higher values of the Army professional ethic and how Army leaders might address this problem. By Dr. Don Snider.
 
Mon, July 22, 2013
Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula remains a dangerous and effective force despite setbacks in Yemen: one of the worst places on earth to cede to terrorists due to its key strategic location. By Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
 
Wed, May 29, 2013
This strategic research paper by a 2013 Army War College student examines the challenges in maintaining security and stability during the normative breakdown associated with post-conflict society. The study identifies actions that may prevent or contribute to the normative breakdown and possible subsequent violence following a conflict, and provides recommendations for planning/ executing stability, security, transition and reconstruction operations. By Lt. Col. Roger P. Hedgepeth, April 2013
 
Thu, May 23, 2013
The perpetuation of the North Korea problem has cast a dark shadow over the future of security and stability in Northeast Asia. But what can be done about it? By Dr. David Lai, Feb 2012
 
Thu, May 23, 2013
In assessing whether and how forward presence still matters in terms of protecting U.S. interests and achieving U.S. objectives, the author reveals that forward-basing yields direct, tangible benefits in terms of military operational interoperability. By John R. Deni, October 2012
 
Thu, May 23, 2013
Parameters' current edition examines the issue: "Drone Wars: Risks and Warnings" by Alan W. Dowd; "Drones over Yemen: Weighing Military Benefits and Political Costs" by W. Andrew Terrill; "Drones: Legitimacy and Anti-Americanism" by Greg Kennedy; Drones: What Are They Good For?
 
Thu, May 23, 2013
The author concludes that cyber power will prove useful as an enabler of joint military operations; that cyber offense is likely to achieve some success, and the harm we suffer is most unlikely to be close to lethally damaging; that cyber power is only information and is only one way in which we collect, store, and transmit information; and, that the sky is not falling because of cyber peril. By Dr. Colin S. Gray
 
Fri, October 12, 2012
Current language articulating a commitment to avoid hollowing out U.S. forces provide a timely interest in reevaluating the term "hollow Army" within its historical context: barely 5 years after the nation disengaged from Vietnam, a struggling economy, and an election year.
 
Tue, October 9, 2012
Forward-basing yields direct, tangible benefits in terms of military operational interoperability and adds to the dialogue regarding the future of American Landpower in the age of austerity.
 
Tue, September 25, 2012
Political and legal decisions create transitions in civil-military relations with implications explored in this monograph
 
Wed, September 19, 2012
Tunisia's government faces challenges in dismantling and reorienting Tunisia's labyrinth of security institutions, yet security sector reform will be critical for building trust and a new social contract between the people and government of Tunisia.
 
Wed, August 15, 2012
Examine how the concept of sustainability could contribute to determining and achieving national security strategic objectives.
 
Mon, July 23, 2012
East-Timor: An intriguing case study in post-conflict reconstruction, security sector reform, and the attempt to establish a new nation state.
 
Sun, July 15, 2012
This paper examines how the Australian Government can assist another government to restore and maintain public security by developing capacity in its security and criminal justice sectors.
 
Sun, July 8, 2012
China is one of the world's leading cyber powers and is working steadily with the intent to develop the capacity to deter or defeat the United States in and through cyberspace.
 
Sun, July 1, 2012
The information element of power is perhaps the least understood -- but increasingly important -- aspect of U.S. national security.
 
Fri, June 8, 2012
As it shifts strategic focus more to the Asia-Pacific region, a USAWC student author argues that there has thus far been too little overarching strategic planning balanced against competing and evolving demands for missile defense capabilities.
 
Fri, June 8, 2012
The exact shape of recently initiated Department of Defense reductions and the defense strategy that down-sized US land forces are to execute in the future are only now becoming clear. How can the Army meet these challenges?
 
Fri, June 1, 2012
As it shifts strategic focus more to the Asia-Pacific region, might the United States have to decide between China and Japan as its chosen ally? Or can it be aligned with both?
 
Fri, June 1, 2012
As it shifts strategic focus more to the Asia-Pacific region, can the United States avoid becoming embroiled in a historic territorial dispute between two of the region's most capable military powers?
 
Fri, May 18, 2012
Since the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Field Artillery branch, more than any other branch in today's Army, has been asked to conduct in-lieu of missions instead of its core fire-support mission in support of the war. In this research paper a US Army War College student examines potential hybrid war challenges and provides recommendations to enhance the Army's capabilities and capacity to address future fire support challenges, including potential field artillery initiatives to enhance inter- and intra-service operations.
 
Fri, May 18, 2012
In the last few years, concepts like "asymmetric warfare", and, more recently, "hybrid warfare" have become a new orthodoxy in military thought. A US Army War College International Fellow examines these concepts in this research paper and concludes that asymmetry and hybridism have been common characteristics of war through the ages since the very beginning of humanity.
 
Tue, May 8, 2012
The U.S. Army heavy conventional ground capability that crushed Iraqi forces in 1991 and 2003 no longer exists, and further reduction of Heavy Brigade Combat Teams are proposed based upon assumptions that there are no enemies willing to challenge alleged U.S. conventional warfare supremacy, or that if challengers arise, precision long range fires will neutralize them. A US Army War College student argues in this research paper that recent examples of hybrid warfare prove beyond any reasonable doubt the worth and utility of a robust, scalable heavy combined arms capability.
 
Tue, May 8, 2012
A US Army War College student argues in this research paper that 21st Century warfare will be hybrid, and recommends changes in strategy and doctrine to ensure the US military is prepared to counter this dangerous, growing threat.
 
Mon, April 30, 2012
The central tenet of the United Kingdom Strategic Defense and Security Review published on 20 October 2010 is that hybrid conflict, as seen most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan, will continue to be the dominant feature of warfare in the twenty-first century. A US Army War College International Fellow argues in this research paper that the United Kingdom needs to reconsider this conclusion and structure its armed forces for major combat operations in the 21st Century.
 
Mon, April 30, 2012
A US Army War College student from the USMC develops a "hybrid" theory of war by combining the most relevant aspects of existing war theories with the unique influences of the current strategic environment to produce a refined theory of war for the modern international arena.
 
Mon, April 9, 2012
The Mass Atrocity Prevention and Response Options (MAPRO) Policy Planning Handbook is a collaborative effort intended to assist the policy community in addressing mass atrocity situations. The MAPRO Handbook supplements the Mass Atrocity Response Operations (MARO) Military Planning Handbook, which was developed by PKSOI and the Harvard Kennedy School's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy.
 
Mon, April 9, 2012
It is prudent to look at a collection of signals and ask what senior leaders should garner from these incidents, especially as they relate to the health of the Army in an era of persistent conflict.
 
Thu, March 15, 2012
Do heavy armored forces have a place in the U.S. Army? Many believe the future security environment makes such units irrelevant, but are they correct?
 
Thu, March 8, 2012
To prevail in future conflicts, the Nation must not only be more adroit at telling its own story but also predictive about adversary inclinations and methods of using misinformation.
 
Thu, March 1, 2012
Explore policy, strategy, and doctrine with respect to crime, terrorism and insurgency, in the particular context of Mexico.
 
Wed, February 15, 2012
Examine lessons learned from previous humanitarian crises, such as Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Darfur, and Burma and their implications for adopting a flexible and tailored U.S. approach toward intervention.
 
Wed, February 15, 2012
There is a need for a strategy to identify future failing states and provide contingency planning and anticipatory assistance. Challenges include: lack of common definitions; lack of real-time predictive analytics; and organizational cultural barriers to contingency planning.
 
Wed, February 8, 2012
Saudi-Iranian rivalry is likely to intensify as a central feature in the Middle Eastern security landscape that reaches into both the Gulf region and the Arab-Israeli theater. Examine what this reality means for the interests of the United States.
 
Wed, February 8, 2012
The global community seems to be redefining sovereignty as the responsibility of governments to protect their peoples' well-being and prevent great harm to those peoples. Thus, a major current and future global security dilemma becomes, "Why, when, and how to intervene to protect people and prevent egregious human suffering?"
 
Wed, February 1, 2012
The U.S. Army War College Information in Warfare Group Information Operations Primer for Academic Year 2012 includes new sections dedicated to U.S. International Strategy for Cyberspace, DoD strategy for Operating in Cyberspace, the Department of State Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications, the DoD Chief Information Officer, and the U.S. Army Cyber Command.
 
Tue, January 24, 2012
An extensive review of policy and strategy regarding Afghanistan and the multilateral, political, economic, and military efforts between 2001 and 2008, which also addresses the ongoing challenges.
 
Tue, January 17, 2012
In this anthology, a group of U.S. Army War College students examine the 21st century security environment and offer diverse and innovative thoughts on how military power could be applied in situations short of general war.
 
Tue, January 10, 2012
Examine the evolution of the Army sustainability program, and how sustainability is contributing to national security strategic objectives.
 
Tue, January 3, 2012
The Information in Warfare Working Group of the U.S. Army War College is pleased to present an anthology of selected student work from Academic Year 2010 providing examples of well-written and in-depth analyses on the vital subject of "Information as Power." This is the fifth volume of an effort that began in 2006.
 
Thu, December 15, 2011
A US Army War College student author examines the processes for and assesses the effectiveness of attempting to cut off financial support to organizations engaging in terrorism.
 
Thu, December 15, 2011
A US Army War College student author explores the causes and implications of the 2008 financial crisis.
 
Thu, December 8, 2011
A US Army War College student author examines Brazil's economic growth over the past decade and its potential to sustain those economic capabilities.
 
Thu, December 8, 2011
A US Army War College student author explores Brazil's economic growth and its potential ramifications for US-Brazilian relations.
 
Thu, December 1, 2011
Two faculty members from the U.S. Army War College's Center for Strategic Leadership examine the United States’ decade-long effort in Vietnam and its thus far eight year effort in Iraq, concluding with three insights regarding the application of land power in current and future conflicts.
 
Thu, December 1, 2011
A US Military Academy intern with the Center for Strategic Leadership examines domestic fuel production as an important geopolitical and international relations issue, using the emerging shale gas industry.
 
Tue, November 22, 2011
A US Army War College author argues rather than attempting to set thresholds, the United States should maintain ambiguity with respect to responding to digital threats.
 
Tue, November 15, 2011
A US Army War College student author explores exploitation of natural resources in Africa and its impacts on regional stability.
 
Tue, November 8, 2011
A US Army War College student author reviews the history and method of operation of the National Defense Stockpile of strategic and critical materials, and provides recommendations for improvement.
 
Tue, November 1, 2011
China's economy and resource import dependence continue to grow at a high rate, increasing Western security community concern over strategic minerals and China's perceived geopolitical strategy to secure strategic resources.
 
Fri, October 21, 2011
In this edited book, each essay focuses on some specific aspect of transitions and develops that aspect in some detail. Each essay offers an independent assessment and makes a valuable and enduring contribution to the body of knowledge on transitions and state-building.
 
Fri, October 14, 2011
This US Army War College student paper examines the events, doctrine, and technical developments of World War II that led to the destruction of cities by area bombing.
 
Fri, October 14, 2011
This US Army War College student paper discusses the issues of values, ethics, and leadership concerning technologically advanced armed forces as they move warfare into the unfamiliar world of combining men and machines into single entities.
 
Fri, October 7, 2011
Examine ethical development and leadership during an officer's younger years, his senior leader years, and his later years and see how high standards can build a courageous organizational bond between soldiers to prevail in the face of insurmountable odds in war and peace.
 
Fri, October 7, 2011
This US Army War College student paper describes ethical strategic leadership style during one senior officer's Army career and examines the extent that his ethical principles and examples affected his soldiers and the Army.
 
Sat, October 1, 2011
This monograph looks at the U.S. Military's struggle to find the correct balance between conventional and counterinsurgency/stability approaches. Using history, the author reminds us that at the end of the wars, armies often "throw the baby out with the bathwater" and revert to a default position for organization and doctrine and fail to inculcate the lessons learned in the recent wars. History shows us that we do not maintain capabilities and capacities to conduct operations in complex environments.
 
Sat, October 1, 2011
This monograph proposes a way for non-military organizations to render assistance and development to fragile states through an organizational approach. The author proffers the concept of the Government Assistance Center as a vehicle for effective coordination and cooperation in Whole of Government and Comprehensive approaches. Conceptually, the Government Assistance Center embodies a standardized camp and organizational structure for decision-making.
 
Thu, September 22, 2011
The general conclusion from experiences over the last decade, particularly from Iraq and Afghanistan, is that providing the host nation with unlimited external assistance or fulfilling an ideal list of state "capabilities" does not a functioning state make. Furthermore, if the number of troubled states and cycle of state dependency continues to grow, the international order will be unable to sustain the escalating demands on donors; thus, long-term success requires effective capacity building and this means that we must understand and think strategically about capacity and capacity-building.
 
Thu, September 22, 2011
This AY 2010 US Army War College student paper analyzes two cases of alleged cyber attacks by Russia, in 2007 and 2008, and recommends a United States strategy to counter any Russian strategy focused on coercing its "near abroad" nations using cyberspace.
 
Thu, September 15, 2011
This US Army Senior Service Fellowship author argues that existing gray areas in military 'strategic communication' activities leave room for the possibility of irrevocable damage to the U.S. military’s credibility as well as to the reputation of the United States.
 
Thu, September 15, 2011
This US Army Senior Service Fellowship author examines -- through the strategist's lenses of ends, ways, and means -- the shifts in the environment of warfare resulting from 'social’ and ‘new’ media.
 
Thu, September 1, 2011
A Commission created by the Obama Administration has recommended preparation of an updated national strategy to secure information and communications infrastructure. An AY2010 US Army War College student author argues that in order to accomplish this, the United States must first successfully define our international cyberspace boundaries.
 
Thu, September 1, 2011
Currently, the United States is the most technologically advanced country with the greatest dependency on computer based systems and networks -- making it also the most vulnerable nation state in the globally connected world. This AY2010 US Army War College student author presents information senior leaders need to know about cyberspace as they seek to prevent or minimize the effects of any future cyber attacks by a nation state or non-state actors.
 
Mon, August 22, 2011
Learn more about assisting the Ethiopian military's professional military educational activities.
 
Mon, August 15, 2011
This monograph addresses command, leadership, and management success attributes at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of stability operations. The author integrates disparate and wide-ranging concepts into a coherent framework to assist a wide audience of military and civilian actors study stability operations.
 
Mon, August 8, 2011
One USAWC elective course provides prospective Joint Service Officers with increased understanding and appreciation for U.S. military forces' past involvement in preparing for, establishing, and administering military governments. Learn more about the subject.
 
Mon, August 1, 2011
An analysis and opinion on the recent reshuffle of the Obama administration's senior national security leaders.
 
Fri, July 22, 2011
This article argues that the U.S. government can mitigate the specter of imperialism by reshaping key aspects of its planning and implementation process. In particular, the U.S. government should partner with developing countries, provide a credible guarantee of withdrawal, and work more prudently to build indigenous governing capacity.
 
Fri, July 22, 2011
The complicated and confusing world involving fragile states and insurgencies, requiring stability operations, makes the mission of the US military more complex. The merging and blending of doctrinal terms, without a clear understanding of what each term entails, increases the difficulty. To clarify this terminology, the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute at the U.S. Army War College presents a comprehensive doctrinal analysis.
 
Fri, July 15, 2011
The Army War College's Center for Strategic Leadership is bringing crises and chaos to some of the top universities in the country. The Center has partnered with several of the nation's top-tier international relations schools to help educate graduate students preparing for careers in national security.
 
Fri, July 15, 2011
In this monograph, Professor Raymond Millen proposes a way for non-military organizations to render assistance and development to fragile states through an organizational approach. Accordingly, he proffers the concept of the Government Assistance Center as a vehicle for effective coordination and cooperation in Whole of Government and Comprehensive approaches.
 
Fri, July 8, 2011
This AY2010 USAWC student research paper discusses the strategic significance of dealing effectively with the American debt and deficit, first describing the background of our current government approach to the economy, then examining the current projections for United States' spending from 2009 through 2019 and concludes by discussing opportunities to successfully address the challenges.
 
Fri, July 8, 2011
This AY2010 USAWC student research paper proposes the U.S. adopt a grand strategy of "economic renewal" with supporting military, diplomatic, and informational strategies to ensure the world sees U.S. actions as those of a global power leading visionary change instead of a declining power trying to hold onto a fading empire.
 
Fri, July 1, 2011
This AY2010 USAWC student research paper explores the impact of ongoing deficit spending in terms of future defense budgets, investor confidence and interest rates, the economic impact of competition for financing, implications for international influence and potential financial leverage of creditors, and our ethical responsibility to future generations.
 
Fri, July 1, 2011
This AY2010 USAWC student research paper analyzes the correlation between the guidance contained in the National Security Strategy, National Military Strategy, National Defense Strategy and the Quadrennial Defense Review on the Army's annual budget submissions.
 
Wed, June 22, 2011
This USAWC 2009 student paper examines the evolution of U.S. strategy since 2001; examines the strategic responsiveness of the joint force; and makes recommendations for improvements ensure strategic responsiveness supports national strategy.
 
Wed, June 15, 2011
This USAWC 2010 student paper examines China's rise in global wealth, its funding of a sustained and extensive military transformation and modernization program, and the implications for the United States.
 
Wed, June 8, 2011
This USAWC 2009 student paper explores the issues of sufficient U.S. military ground force structure in Europe in light of the strategic environment, the U.S. European Command Commander's strategic vision, the current U.S. and global financial crisis, and potential future US National strategies.
 
Wed, June 1, 2011
It is clear that a period of transition is ahead for the U.S. military resulting from the reduction of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as the impact of the American economic recovery. A retired officer reflects on the environmental context and critical areas of concern for the Army as it seeks to ensure "the strength to overcome and the strength to endure."
 
Mon, May 23, 2011
USSOUTHCOM has organized a series of regional Military Engineering and Environment Conferences to support South American nations build institutional capacities; increase sustainability and resilience to natural disasters; identify cooperative civil-military venues and provide recommendations on creating strategic military engineering and environmental alliances throughout the region. Learn more about building partnership capacity in this article.
 
Mon, May 16, 2011
While civilian agencies will normally be the lead for proactively addressing climate change adaptation, they may be insufficient, or absent in distant frontier and border areas where only the military is present. U.S. Southern Command recently co-hosted two climate change-related events in South America, in Colombia focused on climate change adaptation, and in Peru focused on low carbon sustainable economies. Both events emphasized civil-military collaboration on the issues. Learn more about building partnership capacity in this article.
 
Sun, May 8, 2011
Over the past three years U.S. Army War College traveling contact teams have assisted the Armed Forces of Montenegro in the areas of joint staff structure, strategic planning processes, and national strategy reviews. Learn more about building partnership capacity in this article.
 
Fri, April 29, 2011
The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute examines the U.S. military's struggle to find the correct balance between conventional and counterinsurgency/stability approaches. The author uses history to remind us that at the end of wars, Armies often "throw the baby out with the bathwater" and revert to a default position for organization and doctrine instead of inculcating those lessons learned in the recent wars. History shows that we do not maintain capabilities and capacity to conduct operations in complex environments.
 
Fri, April 29, 2011
This paper discusses and highlights, from the national security perspective, potential military actions for interdicting foreign fighters. The foreign fighter problem set, terminology, and life cycle are defined and discussed. Foreign fighters in current conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan/Pakistan, and Somalia are discussed as well. Finally, potential solutions are introduced including actions the U.S. military can take to stem the flow of foreign fighters within stability operations framework.
 
Fri, April 15, 2011
The author departs from conventional wisdom that addresses factors such as mandates, spoilers, and the like, and ignores political factors. He explores Cambodian conflict and peace operations as a complex and interactive situation in which local political conditions were paramount and directly challenged UN peacekeeping principles of neutrality.
 
Fri, April 8, 2011
The uprisings in Egypt are just the latest in a slew of strategic shocks the US has found itself reacting to, rather than predicting. But these hazards are observable, and the US must better consider game-changing crises in advance.
 
Fri, April 1, 2011
Given the experience of the last decade, policymakers are certain to prefer managing future terrorist threats with the fusion of intelligence, law enforcement, and special military operations and not via resource-intensive counterinsurgency (COIN). The prospect of large-scale conventional warfights with competitor states too appears to be of little use to senior decision makers for determining the most demanding future landpower requirements.
 
Fri, April 1, 2011
In November 2010 the Consortium for Homeland Defense and Security in America held its annual symposium to examine pressing issues of shared concern to the domestic security of the United States and its allies. This event was constructed around the challenges of achieving Unity of Effort in preparing for and responding to catastrophic events. How prepared are we?
 
Tue, March 22, 2011
This AY09 USAWC resident student paper examines the current shortage of junior and mid-grade officers in the USAR; evaluates officer manning challenges and related contributing factors in recruiting, accessions, and retention; and proposes several long-term policies and process changes to help resolve officer shortages to meet continued wartime readiness requirements.
 
Tue, March 22, 2011
This award-winning AY09 USAWC resident student paper explores the current challenges faced by Army National Guard leadership to expand the mid-grade officer corps while simultaneously improving the quality and professionalism of those officers.
 
Tue, March 15, 2011
This AY09 USAWC resident student paper examines Army National Guard Aviation to determine if the force structure can remain balanced as an effective and efficient operational force while meeting commitments in support of GWOT, Homeland Defense/Security, and State Active Duty missions.
 
Tue, March 15, 2011
This AY10 USAWC resident student paper focuses on determining the correct size and defining the capabilities that a military consequence management force should have to allow it to move quickly enough to the incident site to conduct its primary mission: saving lives.
 
Tue, March 15, 2011
This AY09 USAWC resident student paper argues that the use of Title 10 forces for homeland security suggests a misunderstanding of the nature of terrorism and that terrorism within the country's borders is a criminal act and the proper responsibility solely of civil law enforcement.
 
Tue, March 8, 2011
The focus of education and training within U.S. military forces since Desert Storm in 1991 has been overwhelmingly weighted toward the defeat of conventional enemy forces as the core, unique competency that only intensively-trained military forces can accomplish. Given the finite and often limited training time available in both military and civilian arenas alike, the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute offers an effective approach to developing leader competencies in stability operations - the arena that has usually been seen as a 'bill-payer.'
 
Tue, March 8, 2011
In a period when senior military and defense leaders are more often practitioners of 'armed social science' than they are of pure military science, they benefit greatly from the strategic advice of individuals often operating outside the control of time-tested bureaucracies and staff structures.
 
Tue, March 8, 2011
Learn about the 5th annual Stability Operations Training and Education Workshop, entitled "Peace and Stability Operations Education and Training: Teaming Challenges and Best Practices", at the National Conference Center, Lansdowne, Virginia, which brought together trainers and educators from within U.S. Government civilian and military agencies, academic institutions, and international and non-government organizations to discuss best practices in Stability Operations training and education.
 
Tue, March 1, 2011
This U.S. Army War College Carlisle Paper presents timely analysis on the critical importance of matching military force posture with vital national interests and the nation's resource capacity to support the force.
 
Tue, March 1, 2011
This annual U.S. Army War College student anthology presents well-written and in-depth analyses on the vital subject of Information as Power.
 
Tue, February 15, 2011
Law enforcement aspects have been an increasingly prominent feature within the U.S. Government's commitment to international operations. This analysis examines lessons from three operations: Panama (1989-99), Colombia (1989-Present), and Kosovo (1998-Present). The results show the pervasive and complex role that law enforcement and related issues have played in contemporary international operations.
 
Tue, February 8, 2011
The Army War College had the opportunity to see the many faces of interagency coordination when the Center for Strategic Leadership recently hosted the Combatant Command Interagency Directorate Symposium.
 
Tue, February 8, 2011
This AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines the degree to which one of the many Theater Security Cooperation programs has it accomplished its purpose as a "Whole-of-Government" tool for establishing enduring civil-military relationships across all levels of foreign societies to promote international stability and security.
 
Tue, February 1, 2011
The world's militaries spend much of their time developing plans that address identified risks, only to find themselves reacting to security threats from an unanticipated sector, or to manmade and natural disasters. A USAWC team recently helped the Serbian Armed Forces improve their capacity to respond rapidly.
 
Tue, February 1, 2011
A USAWC team recently visited Moldova to assist the Moldovan Military Institute revise its professional military education curriculum.
 
Fri, January 14, 2011
This AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines whether and to what extent the U.S. can expect Japan and South Korea to take on an increasing role for security in the Western Pacific region.
 
Fri, January 7, 2011
This AY-09 USAWC resident student paper examines the degree to which U.S. and South Korea share the same perspectives on issues associated with Korean re-unification.
 
Fri, December 31, 2010
This AY-09 USAWC resident course student author examines how and why five islands have become one of the primary potential sources of conflict between South (ROK) and North (DPRK) Korea.
 
Wed, December 15, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author examines three historical case studies in war termination from international relations, domestic politics, and key leader perspectives to develop recommendations for improving the American approach to ending current and future conflicts.
 
Wed, December 15, 2010
This AY-09 USAWC resident course student author argues that "peace" has the potential to be a separate element of statecraft and not simply the absence, termination, or continuation of war.
 
Wed, December 8, 2010
This award winning AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines why conflicts begin, why they continue, and why they end, and then suggests ways to match the instruments of power to intangible political goals.
 
Wed, December 8, 2010
Historically, the majority of American wars have been fought against nation-states and the U.S. has won such wars by destroying the adversary's military power and thereby both its ability and will to continue fighting. This AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines how to terminate the war with al Qaeda, which possesses no clearly demarcated military forces.
 
Wed, December 1, 2010
Recent experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan suggest that the often-indistinct concept of transition urgently requires a greater collective understanding by all actors participating in stability operations. This monograph offers an unparalleled analysis on current research and available tools for transition in post-conflict situations and lays the groundwork for future improved implementation of post-conflict transitions.
 
Tue, November 23, 2010
This AY-09 USAWC resident course student author believes that instituting a comprehensive officer 'sabbatical' program could address important issues related to officer retention, education, changing demographics, civilian competition, and civil-military relations while simultaneously increasing the skills and competencies the officer corps requires in the modern, complex operating environment.
 
Tue, November 23, 2010
This AY-09 USAWC resident course student author argues the Army does not sufficiently espouse, exercise or integrate empowerment into leadership practices and leader developmental processes, thereby failing to maximize the full potential of leaders at all levels. He provides recommendations for the Army to address the issue and assist senior leaders in preparing subordinates for the challenges associated with leading Soldiers in the 21st century.
 
Tue, November 23, 2010
Is a clear statement of the Army officers' professional ethic especially necessary at a time when the Army clearly is stretched and stressed as an institution? This active duty Army author argues that the Army officer corps has both an opportunity and a need to better define itself as a profession, to forthrightly articulate its professional ethic, and clearly to codify what it means to be a military professional.
 
Mon, November 15, 2010
A AY-10 USAWC resident course student author argues that after more than eight years in combat, the Army has come to rely too heavily on operational experience as the predominate driver of leader development and selection. He examines current leader development doctrine, and makes recommendations on how to improve the self-development learning domain to meet the demands of the future.
 
Mon, November 15, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author examines the traits and characteristics required of successful senior leaders and makes recommendations to improve the quality of the education officers and civilians receive at the nation's senior service colleges.
 
Mon, November 15, 2010
As the Nation looks to the institution of the U.S. Army during an era of persistent conflict and after 9 years of war, it is time to recapture professional military education (PME) as part of our profession.
 
Mon, November 8, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines the trends and issues in the U.S. Army that led to the decision to outsource Reserve Officer Training Corps instruction, officer Intermediate Level Education instruction, and doctrine writing and whether those actions place the Army on a path toward loss of control over all its other professional jurisdictions.
 
Mon, November 8, 2010
The "Millennial Generation" will be the military's senior strategic leaders in 2025. This AY-10 USAWC resident student paper examines their generational profile and provides advice to today’s leaders concerning developing this cohort to be the military professionals of tomorrow.
 
Mon, November 8, 2010
The relief of two four-star operational commanders in Afghanistan, America's "war of necessity," warrants an examination of not only civil-military relations but also leader-follower dynamics and the question of whether there was a disconnect between these senior leaders and their bosses.
 
Mon, November 1, 2010
One of the early milestones for Security Sector Reform (SSR) involves the establishment of a constitution for a newly formed government. As the cornerstone for rule of law, development of a constitution is a strategic imperative. However, the degree to which the nations involved in SSR take this task seriously is open to question.
 
Mon, November 1, 2010
"Rule of law" is one of those big ideas that are essential to a favorable world order in the 21st century. Throughout Islamic history, the population and rulers alike were expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the word of God as recorded in the Qur'an (Koran) and the Prophet’s life as provid­ed in the Sunnah and expressed in Sharia. In a similar manner, John Locke believed he was consistent with “natural laws” when he stated “Wherever law ends; tyranny begins.” Hence, these philosophers’ conclusions are not inconsistent with religious points of view as in some manner all major religions seek to explain how men should live in society and provide for justice among themselves.
 
Mon, November 1, 2010
As part of a Rule of Law program, the ability to deal with Detention Operations is vital to the stabilization of a civil society. As we move into an era of uncertainty and persistent conflict, the lines separating war and peace, enemy and friend are often blurred. Emerging and budding conflicts and instability are combining with rapid cultural, social, and technological changes to further complicate our understanding of a secure environment.
 
Mon, October 25, 2010
Establishing an effective local police force is one of the most critical elements of successful counterinsurgency and stability operations. This monograph examines the history of U.S. foreign police training from 1961 to the present and explores the key principles for developing effective local police in the current complex and challenging operational environment.
 
Mon, October 18, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course international student author examines China's long history of strategic thought, and how its classical thinkers are likely to influence its potential current changing strategic calculus from national interest to international influence.
 
Fri, October 8, 2010
This USAWC volume examines the policy and strategy process, the strategic environment, and concludes with some specific current strategic issues. The volume includes several short case studies illustrating the primary material in the volume.
 
Fri, October 1, 2010
Why is America struggling to design effective war strategies? This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author explores manifold factors underpinning this issue and contends that America can and should adjust its approach to war strategy, concluding with recommended proposals how to do so.
 
Fri, October 1, 2010
This USAWC volume reflects the method and manner used to teach strategy formulation to America's future senior leaders, examining general thoughts on the nature and theory of war and strategy, the complex aspect of power, and specific theoretical issues.
 
Wed, September 22, 2010
The Measuring Progress in Conflict Environments (MPICE) Metrics Framework is a hierarchical system of outcome-based goals, indicators, and measures intended to be aggregated to provide indications of trends toward the achievement of stabilization goals over time. MPICE can assist in formulating policy and implementing strategic and operational plans to transform conflict and bring stability to war-torn societies.
 
Wed, September 15, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author develops and proposes adoption of a unifying "theory of war and of 'conflicted peace'" so as to effectively address the conditions and preventive activities associated with the transition from each across a future conflict spectrum ranging from competition through conventional war.
 
Wed, September 15, 2010
Today, land forces are clearly central to addressing the United States' most pressing near-term national security challenges. Whether or not this is a bellwether for the future, however, remains a hotly debated issue across defense-interested communities. This author argues that it is time to require the Army, USMC, and SOF to jointly develop an integrated concept for all land forces operating in and defeating threats in future conflicts.
 
Wed, September 8, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author argues Twenty-first century United States' strategists should rely on Sun Tzu as their primary theorist as they attempt to counter current and emerging national security threats.
 
Wed, September 8, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author argues that in addition to a shift to soft power as the core competency of foreign policy, the United States needs to maintain military might unequaled in the world if it wants to achieve success at keeping American values as the central focus of U.S. foreign and national security policy.
 
Wed, September 1, 2010
Is there an ideal military force to meet the future strategic needs of the United States to effectively combat rising global threats and to secure America's vital national interests? A USAWC AY-10 resident course student addresses this question.
 
Wed, September 1, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author examines key challenges the leaders of the United States likely will face in the not so distant future and makes recommendations on how to prepare the Army for those future national security missions.
 
Mon, August 16, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author addresses the issues of returning Guard soldiers suffering from the invisible wounds of PTSD and recommends procedures and policy to provide better support for returning Guard veterans.
 
Mon, August 9, 2010
If the National Guard's most frequent first response is to a state, and a major second mission is support to Homeland Security, shouldn’t the Guard fall under the Department of Homeland Security rather than the Department of Defense? At least one AY-10 US Army War College graduate thinks so.
 
Mon, August 9, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author argues for further restructuring of the National Guard to provide a sustainable, ready, and reliable operational force capable of meeting all the requirements of an era of persistent conflict.
 
Mon, August 2, 2010
In a recent Foreign Affairs commentary, Secretary Gates again extolled the virtues of "building partner capacity" (BPC) — a cornerstone of contemporary defense policy and a key mission area in the QDR. The common Pentagon narrative on BPC holds that in a world where terrorists, insurgents, cartels, mobs, and proliferators pose fundamental security hazards, the best defense is local. In short, we don't fight ourselves; we make others better at fighting for us. At its foundation, BPC posits that training and equipping foreign security forces is a cheaper and more effective way of extending U.S. influence into areas where it is otherwise difficult to do so. A note of caution is in order. There is precious little room for error when building partner capacity, as the distinction between true partner and unreliable mercenary picket is less clear than most appreciate.
 
Sun, August 1, 2010
This AY-10 USAWC resident course student author argues for employing the National Guard as a principal provider of Security Force Assistance activities in an era of persistent conflict.
 
Tue, July 27, 2010
The Army is abuzz with the concepts surrounding counterinsurgency (COIN), stability operations and other irregular warfare as the United States contends with a complex international environment. This article examines these concepts doctrinally and then suggests another way to look at them. Doctrine is simply a mental model that the military uses to organize and understand its environment and its activities, and then to build a shared understanding of those among service members. The value of a particular mental model—in this case, a doctrine—is not really whether it is right or wrong, but whether it is useful; useful in aiding understanding and in prompting an appropriate institutional response to the environment. An alternative mental model is not necessarily a contradiction of doctrine; it may be merely another useful way of looking at things?
 
Tue, July 27, 2010
The Mass Atrocity Response Operations (MARO) Project seeks to enable the United States and the international community to stop genocide and mass atrocity as part of a broader integrated strategy by explaining key relevant military concepts and planning considerations. The MARO Project is based on the insight that the failure to act in the face of mass killings of civilians oftentimes is not simply a function of political will or legal authority; such a failure also reflects a lack of thinking about how military forces might respond.
 
Thu, July 1, 2010
Man appears to have a greater penchant for conflict than peace, devoting an abundance of attention to the study, preparation, and conduct of war. While the causes of war vary, history suggests that conflict escalation is far easier than de-escalation and resolution. In fact, a direct correlation exists between the level of conflict and the transition from war to peace. Devastating conflicts in particular result not only in substantial casualties and destruction but also shatter societies and governments in the process. Post-conflict states frequently suffer a period of fragility resulting in a psycho-logical loss of vitality, hope, and self-confidence, which accompanies the political, social, and economic turmoil. Because this fragility exposes the state to subversion, political upheaval, and insurgency, the issue may become a major concern for the international community.
 
Thu, July 1, 2010
The aftermath of the Cold War posed unanticipated challenges to U.S. national security. In response, the U.S. military adopted full spectrum operations in order to focus renewed attention on the importance of stability operations. Transition is an important concept in stability operations, but it is inherently problematic and poorly understood. As our experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to illustrate, transition is a strategic issue of the first order. It is well past the time to take a closer look at the volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA) that elevates transition to the strategic level of concern and the implications for U.S. strategy, planning, and operations.
 
Thu, June 24, 2010
A USAWC AY2009 resident student examined the "neglected relationship" between the U.S. and Mexico, and argues federal government of the U.S. must do more if the country wants to avoid significant national security problems.
 
Fri, June 18, 2010
An in-depth study by a Vanderbilt University researcher urges continuing and even broadening the use of military exchange activities with nations with less than perfect human rights records.
 
Tue, June 1, 2010
Will leaders develop an "Airland Battle" equivalent for cyberspace, or will they wait until the next war to strike the balance at potentially great cost to our Nation?
 
Mon, May 17, 2010
Examine Intergovernmental Organizations as key organizations providing structures, fluid channels of communication, and capabilities to facilitate capacity building and maintain security in Sub-Saharan Africa.
 
Fri, May 7, 2010
Brazil's 2008 National Strategic Defense Plan provides both challenges and opportunities for the United States as a new administrations in each nation contemplate our bilateral relationship.
 
Fri, April 30, 2010
America's nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, especially in today's irregular, asymmetric warfare climate, could be little more than slow-moving targets.
 
Thu, April 22, 2010
This AY2009 USAWC international resident student paper analyzes some of the most important challenges to Lebanon's national security both in a historical context and in view of past and present terrorism phenomena.
 
Mon, April 12, 2010
The nature of warfare and military decision-making is understood to be both art and science, the combination of which varies according to situational and functional circumstances. Given the importance of strategic communication to current and future warfare, it is essential to consider its application from both perspectives.
 
Sun, April 11, 2010
After World War II the United States Congress wrote laws to prohibit homosexuals from openly serving in the military. President Clinton was responsible for the updated policy in effect today known as "Don't Ask Don’t Tell," now almost 15 years old. This AY2009 USAWC resident student paper reviews the historical background of the current policy and multiple factors bearing on any decision to change that policy.
 
Sun, April 11, 2010
How does cyberspace impact the military operational environment?
 
Mon, March 22, 2010
The nature of warfare and military decision-making is accepted to be both art and science; so how does strategic communication play into that process?
 
Mon, March 15, 2010
Failure to understand the responsibilities and the dynamics of the civil-military relationship leads to erroneous decisions.
 
Mon, March 8, 2010
This USAWC AY2009 international student Strategy Research Project paper explores the causal effects that have contributed to Haiti's position as one of the least developed countries, pin-points weaknesses in the past approach to assisting the Haitian people, and proposes changes to enable a strategy to create a stable and secure environment.
 
Mon, March 8, 2010
The danger of déjà vu -- the thing we take hold of tends to be the most recent or most vivid memory that quickly comes to mind. But not always the most appropriate?
 
Mon, March 8, 2010
Senior leaders need to scan the strategic horizon for potential cyberspace-related technological and societal trends and shocks.
 
Mon, March 8, 2010
This article focuses on two key antecedents of strategic thinking—creative and critical thinking—and presents the Army War College approach to educating students in these skills.
 
Mon, February 22, 2010
The Information in Warfare Working Group of the U.S. Army War College is pleased to present this anthology of selected student work from Academic Year 2009 providing examples of well-written and in-depth analyses on the vital subject of "Information as Power." This is the fourth volume of an effort that began in 2006.
 
Fri, February 12, 2010
An examination of multiple Vice Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs' use of the Joint Requirements Oversight Council offers four broad insights for senior leaders who use or are considering using "leadership groups" to help shape strategic decisions.
 
Mon, February 8, 2010
Clausewitz wrote "The first, the supreme, the most far-reaching act of judgment that the statesman and commander have to make is to establish . . . the kind of war on which they are embarking." Today the term "Hybrid War" is being widely used. But what is it?
 
Fri, January 29, 2010
This award-winning USAWC international student paper examines the social-economic-political factors perceived to be driving Iran towards nuclear armament, and potential associated policy alternatives for the US, Pakistan and other regional actors.
 
Fri, January 15, 2010
Africa flickers in and out of the national security spotlight, e.g., Darfur, piracy, operations related to the War on Terror, perceived Chinese designs on natural and agricultural resources, and the establishment of U.S. Africa Command. In this work subject matter experts examine Africa from multiple geographic, economic and human development, and U.S. national security perspectives.
 
Thu, January 7, 2010
Most migration is from the developing to the developed world, offering both opportunities and complications for governments. So called provider country "brain drains" benefit the receiving countries, but uncontrolled influxes of labor also can stress existing social support infrastructure and increase nationalistic tensions. Should the military have any role in regulating migration?
 
Fri, January 1, 2010
Examine U.S. strategy and policy with respect to Afghanistan from the Cold War through the end of the Bush administration.
 
Fri, January 1, 2010
Explore NATO's attempt to achieve unity of effort in Afghanistan from 2002 through the present.
 
Sun, December 20, 2009
In this second in a series of six monographs analyzing the development of an officer corps strategy, the authors first define "talent" and then explore the interdependency of accessing, developing, retaining and employing "talented" Army leaders. The authors propose differences between "competent" and "talented" leaders, discuss what talents the U.S. Army should seek in its officer corps, and examine the consequences of failing to create an officer talent management system.
 
Sun, December 13, 2009
In this monograph Dr. Colin Gray emphasizes the necessity for strategic education to help develop a viable strategic approach, the way of thinking that can illuminate or solve strategic problems. He believes that a strategist will perform better in today's world if he has mastered and can employ strategy's general theory, and argues the case for strategy being both possible and teachable.
 
Sun, December 6, 2009
This case study provides insights into how the military interacts with host-nation governments, the United Nations, the State Department, and national embassies while attempting to solve today's complex problems. The author reveals many pitfalls in security sector building and international team-building that the U.S. is trying to avoid today.
 
Tue, December 1, 2009
In recent years, adversaries, armed with new media capabilities and an information-led warfighting strategy, have proven themselves capable of challenging the most powerful militaries in the world. Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and blogs have arguably become as important to the strategic outcome of military operations as bullets, troops and air power.
 
Sun, November 22, 2009
With the publication of the 1982 version of Army Field Manual (FM) 100-5, Operations, the U.S. Army introduced the concept of an operational level of war encompassing the planning and conduct of campaigns and major operations. It was followed three years later by the introduction of the term "operational art" which was, in practice, the skillful management of the operational level of war. This conception of an identifiably separate level of war that defined the jurisdiction of the profession of arms was, for a number of historical and cultural reasons, attractive to U.S. practitioners and plausible to its English-speaking allies. The authors argue that as warfare continues to diffuse across definitional and conceptual boundaries and as the close orchestration of all of the instruments of national power becomes even more important, the current conception of campaigns and operations becomes crippling. To cope with these demands by formulating and prosecuting national campaigns, the authors propose that the responsibility for campaign design should return to the political-strategic leadership of nations supported by the entirety of the state bureaucracy. This would mark the return of the campaign to its historical sources. If the United States and its allies fail to make this change, they risk continuing to have a “way of battle” rather than a “way of war.”
 
Sun, November 22, 2009
This monograph is intended to help political, military, policy, and academic leaders think strategically about explanations, consequences, and responses that might apply to the volatile and dangerous new dynamic that has inserted itself into the already crowded Mexican and hemispheric security arena; the privatized Zeta military organization. In Mexico, this new dynamic involves the migration of traditional hard-power national security and sovereignty threats from traditional state and non-state adversaries to hard and soft power threats from professional private non-state military organizations. This dynamic also involves a more powerful and ambiguous mix of terrorism, crime, and conventional war tactics, operations, and strategies than were experienced in the past. Moreover, this violence and its perpetrators tend to create and consolidate semi-autonomous enclaves (criminal free-states) that develop into quasi-states—and what the Mexican government calls "Zones of Impunity." All together, these dynamics not only challenge Mexican security, stability, and sovereignty, but, if left improperly understood and improperly countered, also challenge the security and stability of the United States and Mexico's other neighbors.
 
Sun, November 15, 2009
While massive amounts of information can provide the opportunity to broaden and expand thought, it also can, and does, overwhelm people already constrained by time as they juggle the daily requirements of life.
 
Sun, November 15, 2009
This monograph reexamines the 1973 Arab-Israeli War and the 1991 Gulf War for insights that may be relevant for ongoing dangers during limited wars involving nations possessing chemical or biological weapons or emerging nuclear arsenals. Both of these wars were fought at the conventional level, although the prospect of Israel using nuclear weapons (1973), Egypt using biological weapons (1973), or Iraq using chemical and biological weapons (1991) were of serious concern at various points during these conflicts. This monograph discusses why efforts at escalation control and intra-war deterrence were successful in these two case studies and assesses the points at which these deterrence efforts were under the most intensive stress that might have caused them to fail.
 
Sun, November 15, 2009
The "China Dragons" of the 28th Combat Support Hospital deployed in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM from September 2006 until November 2007. This combat tour was historic in many regards, with the team challenged by unprecedented casualty numbers and indirect fire attacks. Not only did they save thousands of lives; they helped advanced trauma medicine, as leading hospitals worldwide have benefitted from military initiatives in the areas of bleeding control and hemostatic resuscitation. Their service epitomizes the strides that have been made in military combat medicine, and their challenges highlight the areas in which our medical system can improve further.
 
Sun, November 8, 2009
The author argues that references to a uniform "left turn" in the region are misleading, and that Latin America is actually witnessing a dynamic competition between two very different forms of governance. Represented by leaders like Hugo Chávez, Evo Morales, and others, radical populism emphasizes the politics of grievance and a penchant for extreme solutions. Moderate, centrist governance can be found in countries like Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Uruguay where diplomatic pragmatism, the protection of democratic practices, and the need to blend macroeconomic responsibility with a social conscience are emphasized. The author argues that to the extent that the United States can strengthen these centrist governments while limiting the damage caused by radical populism it will be able to promote integral growth, democratic stability, and effective security cooperation in Latin America. A clear understanding of the trends discussed is essential to devising appropriate U.S. policies toward that region.
 
Sun, November 8, 2009
U.S. Southern Command continuously seeks to build public-private partnerships to tackle the issues affecting national and regional security, among which is food security. This brief report discusses the conduct and findings from one recent workshop intended to promote interagency dialogue among the attending USG organizations and facilitate the development of a joint, coordinated and comprehensive plan for food security activities in Latin American and the Caribbean region.
 
Sun, November 8, 2009
In this Letort Paper the authors analyze Security Force Assistance (SFA) and some specific recommendations designed to improve U.S. performance. While SFA may be a new term, the activities themselves are familiar ones related to how the Department of Defense works to train, advise, and assist foreign partners' security establishments to accomplish common objectives. The United States has demonstrated serious SFA deficiencies in recent years. As Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has noted the United States is likely to remain actively and broadly engaged in SFA for many years to come. The need for comprehensive improvement encompasses DoD military and civilian efforts and requires thoughtful integration with broader whole of government approaches.
 
Fri, October 30, 2009
Soon after the dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics increasing numbers of Russian intellectuals became disenchanted with the West, especially the United States, and began to look for alternative geopolitical alliances. The Muslim world in general and Iran in particular became especially important in the geopolitical construction of Eurasianists or neo-Eurasianists who believed that Russia's alliance with Iran is essential for Russia’s rise to power. Yet, by the middle of President Vladimir Putin’s tenure, increasing tension with the Muslim community and the rise of Russian nationalism had led to more complicated views by the Russian elite concerning Iran. At present, the Russian elite are willing to use Iran as a bargaining chip when negotiating with the West, especially the United States, and as a market for Russian weapons and other goods and services. However, the dream of a Russian-Iran axis has apparently been abandoned.
 
Fri, October 30, 2009
The United Nations Development Program "Human Development Report" defined “Human Security” in terms of seven component tenets: Economic Security, Food Security, Health Security, Environmental Security, Personal Security, Community Security and Political Security. This brief paper provides a starting point for examining the full range of potential national security ramifications associated with one of those tenets, Food Security.
 
Fri, October 30, 2009
Through the lens of the Multi-National Forces-Iraq Force Strategic Engagement Cell (FSEC), the author illustrates how Key Leader Engagements (KLE) can be incorporated as "targets" in the U.S. military's targeting process. FSEC’s mission to reach out to Iraq-based insurgent organizations who sought reconciliation with the Iraqi government was entirely based in KLE-related targeting. FSECs activities, therefore, present a suitable case to study how including KLE as “targets” can maximize the utility of the relationships commanders and diplomats alike establish during counterinsurgency and nation-building operations. These operations also demonstrate the employment of KLE as a part of Information Operations, and the challenges associated with developing and refining intelligence to support KLE targeting. Finally, FSEC’s endeavors in Iraq underscore the utility of outreach to both local leaders and insurgent populations in counterinsurgency operations.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
The author outlines in detail the major criminal activities in Iraq and also considers the critical role played by corruption in facilitating and strengthening organized crime. He also explains the rise of organized crime after the US invasion and identifies necessary responses to organized crime and corruption in Iraq. This monograph looks in detail at major criminal activities, including the theft, diversion, and smuggling of oil, the kidnapping of both Iraqis and foreigners, extortion, car theft and smuggling of antiquities.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
This guide focuses on the military's role in rebuilding and establishing a functional, effective, and legitimate nation-state; one that can assure security and stability for its citizens, defend its borders, deliver services effectively for its populace, and is responsible and accountable to its citizens. Neither a handbook nor a checklist, a comprehensive approach to planning and implementing a program to rebuild governance by U.S. peacekeeping forces during stability operations that provides options and trade-offs for U.S. forces in executing these operations.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
The author outlines eight principles for a risk management defense strategy. He argues that these principles provide "measures of merit" for evaluating the new administration's defense choices. This monograph builds on two previous works-Known Unknowns: Unconventional "Strategic Shocks" in Defense Strategy Development and The New Balance: Limited Armed Stabilization and the Future of US Landpower. Combined, these three works offer key insights on the most appropriate DOD responses to increasingly "unconventional" defense and national security conditions.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
Small or emerging countries are not shielded from the downstream effects of manning, equipping, and resourcing decisions. Military modernization initiatives have domestic, regional, and international impacts on a nation's public, trade, finance, aid, and foreign policies. Awareness of these issues is especially important for nations within the U.S. Africa Command region.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
The author provides a detailed chronology and analysis of the intelligence failures and successes of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The author contends that when our national security is at stake, the US should not hesitate to undertake risky intelligence collection operations, including espionage, to penetrate our adversary's deceptions. At the same time, the US must also understand that our adversary may not believe the gravity of our policy warnings or may not allow its own agenda to be influenced by US diplomatic pressure.
 
Tue, September 29, 2009
The author addresses climate change, in which man-made global warming is a major factor, and that it will likely lead to dramatic and long lasting consequences with security implications, making it a challenge the US must urgently take up. The author argues that security implications will be most profound in places where the effects of climate change are greatest, particularly affecting weak states already especially vulnerable to environmental destabilization. Two things are vitally important: stemming the tide of climate change and adapting to its far-reaching consequences.
 
Sun, August 30, 2009
Civilian casualties associated with coalition air support activities have strained U.S. Afghan relations and forced the CENTCOM Commander to review the use of this valuable asset in theater. This AY2009 USAWC resident student paper addresses how the U.S. can balance the kinetic effects of airpower with strategic objectives in counterinsurgency.
 
Sun, August 30, 2009
The struggle to solve the sanctuary problem within Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA) can be attributed to a failure by the U.S. administration and military to fully comprehend that this is a "wicked" problem with unique attributes and characteristics and thus requires new approaches. This AY2009 USAWC resident student paper explores each attribute of the "wicked" problem construct and then offers an approach on how President Obama and his decision makers can "tame" Pakistan's FATA problem.
 
Sun, August 30, 2009
This AY2009 USAWC resident student paper examines the processes involved to deploy and sustain larger U.S. forces operating in Afghanistan and addresses options to overcome strategic access challenges. The author proposes that any sound and executable strategic access plan must incorporate five specific activities: strengthening regional partnerships; reducing dependence on Afghan-Pakistani Ground Lines of Communication; re-establishing a Northern Distribution Network; seeking alternative regional air bases; and improving In-Transit Visibility technology.
 
Sun, August 30, 2009
An AY-2009 USAWC resident student critique of current military doctrinal guidance relating to the creation and employment of Provincial Reconstruction Teams.
 
Sun, August 30, 2009
An AY-2009 USAWC resident student examines and compares historical and current military doctrinal guidance relating to the creation and execution of "Military Government."
 
Wed, July 29, 2009
This Carlisle Paper addresses the question of whether the Army has the proper structure and training to perform full spectrum operations. The author reports that 3-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT) effectively operated as a "full spectrum force" during Operation ARROWHEAD RIPPER in Baqubah, Iraq, in 2007. The brigade commander, providing adaptive leadership, organized the SBCT to conduct simultaneous kinetic and non-kinetic operations, and to leverage the Iraqi military, local leaders, and Iraqi systems already in place to defeat al-Qaeda and stabilize the city.
 
Wed, July 29, 2009
This Carlisle Paper contends that peace has a pragmatic quality and the potential to be a separate element of statecraft, not simply the absence, termination, or continuation of war. The author's research reveals that a complex, paradigmatic change in statecraft must occur to employ peace as a "shaping" and sustaining action. He concludes that further inquiry is required to understand fully the potential of peace as a tool, one similar to "soft power."
 
Wed, July 29, 2009
This PKSOI Paper is designed to further U.S. military understanding of the critical nation-state building role that U.S. forces play during stability operations. The authors examine an intervening force's contribution to creating a functional state that can deliver services effectively, is responsive and accountable to its citizens, and is capable of assuring security. The discussion summarizes key issues, trade-offs, and options for military strategists and planners that relate to the restoration and rebuilding of government in the context of full spectrum operations.
 
Wed, July 29, 2009
Recent political changes in both the United States and South Africa have opened a new window of opportunity for developing a productive partnership. This monograph outlines helpful ways in which the United States can contribute to the SA Army's forward planning process so as to help optimize South Africa's potential contribution to the emergence of a peaceful and stable Africa.
 
Wed, July 29, 2009
This Carlisle Paper illustrates the key characteristics of China's culture-philosophy, history, and domestic factors--that structure the strategic objectives of its foreign policy. These characteristics explain how China's strategic interests are defined by its pragmatic nationalism, its drive for modernization, its desire for a more prominent role in the Asian and world communities. The author's concluding analysis of the implications of China's strategic culture offers recommendations for U.S. national security policy.
 
Wed, July 1, 2009
The author argues that the Merida Initiative, a U.S. multiyear counterdrug program designed to help the Mexican Government fight the drug cartels, may not be the optimal solution. Instead the United States must forge a more creative and encompassing approach. The author asserts that this strategy should combine interdiction and enforcement initiatives with an array of social, economic, political, and U.S. domestic programs to create a broad effort that attacks the drug trade from all sides.
 
Wed, July 1, 2009
The author addresses the multifaceted nature and predominant role of gangs operating as state and non-state proxies in the global security environment. He examines examples of contemporary populism and neo-populism, 21st century socialists, and a non-state actor (al-Qaeda) seeking regional and global hegemony. The lessons he derives from these cases demonstrate how gangs might fit into a holistic effort to force radical political-social-economic change, and illustrate how traditional political-military objectives may be achieved indirectly.
 
Wed, July 1, 2009
China's interest in African stability and long-term access to African resources through the lens of the three variables that have characterized recent U.S. national security strategy: diplomacy, development, and defense.
 
Wed, July 1, 2009
The author explores the intersection of culture with strategy and policy. The ability to understand and appreciate the role and impact of culture on policy and strategy is increasingly seen as a critical strategic thinking skill. The concepts and framework provided by the author have formed the foundation for how the U.S. Army War College has incorporated culture into the study of strategy and policy.
 
Thu, May 28, 2009
Even a brief survey of new media's nature and impact leaves military leaders with some proverbially powerful bottom lines. Their significance likely also makes them worthy of consideration by the senior civilian leadership of the military.
 
Thu, May 28, 2009
The author calls for an unconventional revolution in U.S. landpower forces that optimizes them for intervention in complex and violent crises of governance and security in states crippled with internal disorder. He argues that the armed stabilization of states and regions in crises will not be just equivalent in importance to traditional warfighting in future land force planning, but will be the primary land force mission for the foreseeable future.
 
Thu, May 28, 2009
The author analyzes NATO defense expenditures over the past 10 years and troop contributions of the 1999 wave of new members (Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland) during three NATO missions: Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan. He concludes that these new members are fulfilling their commitments, including contributions to NATO missions, and suggests that as new member capabilities and levels of interoperability have increased, new member states have been more willing to take on additional responsibility and burdens.
 
Thu, May 28, 2009
The PLA is involved in an increasing number of missions. This book explores these, including disaster and humanitarian relief, UN peacekeeping operations, counterterrorism and border defense, and outer space and cyberspace security. Chapter authors consider the interplay between China's armed forces and its complex foreign policy and international security environment, describe how these interactions affect China's policy toward the Asia-Pacific region, and provide implications for U.S. strategic interests.
 
Thu, May 28, 2009
The authors argue for a comprehensive Officer Corps strategy recognizing the interdependency of accessing, developing, retaining and employing talent. They conclude that without such a talent-focused strategy, the Army and its Officer Corps confront the increasing likelihood that they will be unequal to future American national security demands.
 
Wed, April 29, 2009
In Afghanistan, provincial reconstruction teams (PRTs) have played a growing role in the U.S. counterinsurgency effort. While civilian agencies remain essential for long-term economic development, the authors argue that PRTs conduct reconstruction in ways that create short-term stability. Accordingly, they recommend that the United States give the PRTs the lead role in reconstruction activities that accompany any surge of military forces into Afghanistan.
 
Wed, April 29, 2009
Arms control issues feature prominently in the Russo-American conflicted agenda. These represent political as well as military issues that are among the most critical components of the bilateral relationship and of regional security in both Europe and Asia. The author analyses both the political and military aspects of the relationship with respect to arms control.
 
Wed, April 29, 2009
U.S.-Russian relations seem to be at an impasse. However, given these nations' power, standing, and nuclear capability, dialogue will be resumed at some point. An analysis of the prospects for and conditions favoring cooperation is an urgent task -- crucial precisely because current relations are so difficult. The chapters of this volume represent both a tribute to a vision of political order based upon prior cooperation and a call to revitalize the relationship.
 
Wed, April 29, 2009
The term "Information Operations" means different things to different people. The author of this article argues it's time for a doctrinal pause to allow a clean slate review of information operations, strategic communication and, yes, cyberspace operations. He believes that such a review may find that "simpler is better."
 
Thu, April 2, 2009
Despite fissures within the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and the competitive tendencies within the Sino-Russian partnership, the author contends that the United States will not have an easy time achieving its aims in Central Asia. She argues that the rhetoric about a new Cold War in the aftermath of the Georgian crisis obscures the common interests of the great powers share in addressing transnational problems in Central Asia.
 
Wed, April 1, 2009
The author argues that Kazakhstan's armed forces, though subject to many structural changes, have not yet experienced systemic military reform. He assesses the achievements and setbacks of U.S. and NATO defense assistance to the country, while also showing that Kazakhstan remains deeply linked in close defense and security partnership with Russia.
 
Sun, March 29, 2009
The successful November 1942 Allied invasion of North Africa resulted from a rare combination of effective strategic planning, intelligence-based deception, operational security, and good luck. According to this USAWC faculty author, the episode offers lessons relevant to contemporary theater campaign planning and information operations.
 
Sat, March 28, 2009
Pioneers of nuclear-age policy analysis, Albert and Roberta Wohlstetter emerged as two of America's most consequential, innovative and controversial strategists. Although the Wohlstetters' strategic concepts and analytical methods continue to be highly influential, no book has brought together their most important published and unpublished essays -- until now.
 
Wed, February 25, 2009
Pioneers of nuclear-age policy analysis, Albert and Roberta Wohlstetter emerged as two of America's most consequential, innovative and controversial strategists. Although the Wohlstetters' strategic concepts and analytical methods continue to be highly influential, no book has brought together their most important published and unpublished essays - until now.
 
Wed, February 25, 2009
The author explores the actual and potential effects of the Iraq War that will face U.S. policymakers: the flow of refugees and displaced persons from Iraq; cross-border terrorism; the potential intensification of separatism and sectarian discord among Iraq's neighbors; and transnational crime.
 
Wed, February 25, 2009
This monograph identifies the "pieces of the puzzle" most relevant to national security strategy; surfaces the leading assumptions held by American policymakers and strategists; considers alternative national security policies; and specifies the necessary components of a sustainable national security strategy.
 
Wed, February 25, 2009
Operations Security is ever more challenging with the proliferation of new media availability on the battlefield. Cell phones and Internet access have made the military operating environment increasingly transparent. Add to that the expectation of Soldiers to access to social media sites and the complexity of Operations Security dramatically increases, demanding Commanders' emphasis as never before.
 
Wed, February 25, 2009
Examine how a USAWC faculty team recently assisted the Albanian Armed Forces senior leadership to address national security and military strategy development.
 
Mon, January 26, 2009
Latin American countries, in varying degrees, are suffering from the combination of weak states, ungoverned space, terrorism, and international criminal networks resulting in a different kind of war that defies borders. The author analyzes the critical role that the United States plays in the emerging security environment in the region.
 
Sat, January 24, 2009
This monograph explores the Palestinian movement, Hamas, and the recent Israeli strategies directed at this group and Palestinian nationalism external to the Fatah faction of the Palestinian Authority during the period leading up to the current active armed conflict.
 
Thu, January 22, 2009
Information as an element of power is increasingly more important. The Information in Warfare Working Group of the U.S. Army War College is pleased to present an anthology of selected student work from Academic Year 2008 representing examples of well-written and in-depth analyses on the vital subject of Information as Power. This anthology addresses issues and recommends solutions regarding the nexus of national security and information.
 
Sun, December 28, 2008
"Known Unknowns: 'Unconventional Strategic Shock' in Defense Strategy Development" examines this issue head on. Historically, defense strategy demonstrates three flaws: it is generally reactive, it lacks sufficient strategic imagination, and as a result it is vulnerable to surprise. The current administration confronted a game-changing "strategic shock" in its first 8 months in office. It was highly disruptive to DOD's worldview. The next administration and its Department of Defense leaders would be well-advised to expect the same kind of unconventional, nonmilitary shock to defense convention early in its first term.
 
Sun, December 28, 2008
As the nation approaches a new Administration, intense review of the foundational concepts of homeland security and homeland defense is underway. Brought together on the march and under fire under the previous Presidency, elemental definitions are being scrutinized to ensure they meet the requirements of domestic security which may lie ahead.
 
Sun, December 28, 2008
The dissolution of the Soviet Bloc and the disintegration of Yugoslavia produced 22 new independent governments across Europe and Central Asia. For those smaller entities at the lower end of the viability spectrum, independence, with the resulting disappearance of the economic and defense security blankets, has been more of a cold shower than a warm bath.
 
Sun, December 28, 2008
This article considers opportunities and challenges for the warfighter in an information environment increasingly dominated by "that combustible mix of 24/7 cable news, call-in radio and television programs, Internet bloggers and online websites, cell phones and iPods (Marvin Kalb). "New media" certainly enables our adversaries, but offers opportunities for the U.S. warfighter as well.
 
Fri, November 28, 2008
Examine the contemporary threat environment and how it may shape American security policy for the next presidential administration.
 
Fri, November 28, 2008
Over the last three decades America's concerns about border security have steadily escalated from what was once largely a humanitarian issue to concerns over paramilitary violence, organized crime, and international terrorism. New threats portend a new challenge for the military, both active and reserve components, if we are not to leave the nation's citizenry vulnerable.
 
Fri, November 28, 2008
Six principles believed capable of guiding future state-building activities and enhancing America's ability to "win the peace" while stabilizing chaotic regions.
 
Fri, November 28, 2008
The author of this monograph revises, reexamines, and reevaluates the contemporary military environment. He finds that the environment is a period of relative military stasis, of slow technological development, and of little novelty in broader issues. He concludes that this stasis affords us the time to examine the strategic environment more closely to ensure we truly understand its character.
 
Fri, November 28, 2008
USAFRICOM represents a logical step in proactive peacetime engagement. Yet the new command underscores an appearance of policy militarization and thus potentially ultimately weakens the link between the two threads. A nonmilitary lead coupled with still more diversified U.S. Government participation could strengthen the bond between military and nonmilitary threads of US foreign policy. To do this requires addressing the scale of required change and the perceptions of militarizing our foreign policy.
 
Recent experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan suggest that the often-indistinct concept of transition urgently requires a greater collective understanding by all actors participating in stability operations. This monograph offers an unparalleled analysis on current research and available tools for transition in post-conflict situations and lays the groundwork for future improved implementation of post-conflict transitions.