AY09 DMSPO Electives
 

Information Operations

  Theater Logistics
  Special Operations
  Campaign Analysis Course (CAC) I
  Non-Lethal Weapons
  Sea Power: Naval Strategy and Operations
    Airpower Strategic Partner
    Expeditionary Warfare
    Case Studies in Center of Gravity Determination
    American Involvement in Vietnam
    International Hot Spots & the Military Implications
    Campaign Analysis Course (CAC) II
    Joint Warfighting Advanced Studies Program (JWASP)
    Challenges in Theater Intelligence
    Space Operations for Senior Leaders
    European Campaign of 1944-1945
    Coalition Warfare: The American Approach to Multinational Operations in the 20th Century
    Command in Future War

Information Operations
This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of Information Operations (IO) planning at the strategic and operational levels. Initially, the definitions IO and strategic communication are considered as well as the critical linkage between. This is followed by an examination of IO doctrine and organization at both the joint and service levels. Next, critical core and related IO activities are analyzed with numerous historical examples serving to illustrate both successes and failures. The IO planning process is then used to integrate the various IO capabilities into the overall theater campaign plan to ensure the coordination and synchronization of both kinetic and non-kinetic effects. Finally, a historical case study provides an opportunity to analyze how IO might have been used to affect the outcome of the event in a manner more consistent with U.S. interests and values. This course provides a solid foundation for the use of information as an element of national power at the operational level.
 
Theater Logistics
This elective course examines logistics issues in a theater of operation. Topics include Force Projection; Joint Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (JRSOI); Supply Chain Management and Theater Distribution; Maintenance Operations; Contractors on the Battlefield to include capabilities of operational contract support , integration, and management; Civil Augmentation Programs (CAPs); Logistics C2; other joint logistics services and operations; emerging joint logistics concepts; and campaign sustainment concept. The course will include a field trip to the Defense Distribution Center (DDC) and the Defense Distribution Depot Susquehanna, PA (DDSP).
 
Special Operations
This course will provide a detailed examination of joint and service perspectives on U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF). Each lesson treats a unique aspect of SOF to include each Service’s SOF organization, mission, capabilities, limitations, and employment considerations. Case studies will be used as the vehicle to focus the student on the application of SOF in support of political and military objectives both unilaterally as well as in conjunction with joint conventional and multinational forces. The course is designed primarily for the future conventional force commander, military planners, and civilian leaders. Students with previous SOF experience will be considered for enrollment only if the elective does not meet the minimum enrollment criteria.
 
Campaign Analysis Course (CAC) I
CAC I is a study of the evolution of strategy and the art of war from antiquity to the beginning of WWII. The course builds on the base established in the core curriculum, particularly Theory of War and Strategy; Strategic Leadership; National Security, Policy, and Strategy; and Theater Strategy and Campaigning. In it students will examine the evolution of strategy and the art of war by assessing selected episodes from antiquity to the beginning of WWII. The episodes selected for analysis offer insight to the current situations in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia and are not otherwise available in the core curriculum or other elective courses. CAC I is not a prerequisite for CAC II. However, all students, particularly International Fellows, are encouraged to participate in both courses to offer their perspectives on the evolution of strategy and the art of war.
 
Non-Lethal Weapons
This course is designed to acquaint the student officer with current research and development into non-lethal weapons and their employment. To this end, this elective course will describe and analyze these efforts and the issues that underlie non-lethal weapons. It will address the past use of non-lethal concepts and technologies; define the capabilities that could be made available to our armed forces; examine the medical, legal, and public awareness issues involved in their development and use; and analyze their incorporation into current U.S. military doctrine and strategy. Tactical and operational events in Somalia, Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq and the potential for military operations supporting Homeland Defense require the military to have available a variety of non-lethal weapons to mitigate non-belligerent casualties and to control the escalation of conflict. The use of non-lethal weapons raises a plethora of human effects, public perception, and legal and operational issues. What will be the public perception of weapons that injure but do not kill? What international and domestic laws impact the development and use of non-lethal weapons? Can the expectations of effectiveness, e.g. minimal casualties, be met? The Department of Defense has mounted a multidiscipline R&D approach to ensure that non-lethal weapons development and deployment meet this multiplicity of requirements. This course will include a field trip to a local firing range where students will fire a number of non-lethal blunt force munitions.
 
Sea Power: Naval Strategy and Operations
This course is designed to enhance the understanding of U.S. naval strategy and operations. The student will be provided the opportunity to examine the evolution of the Navy’s vision from Alfred Thayer Mahan to the most recent Maritime Strategy, “A Cooperative Strategy for the 21st Century.” Students will also develop an understanding of what the Navy can provide to the theater commander’s engagement strategy and to the overall joint war fight. One lesson will be dedicated to the U.S. Marine Corps and its evolving concept of expeditionary maneuver warfare, “Operational Maneuver from the Sea.” Navies and Navy technology will be explored as they relate to Command of the Sea. A three-day, two-night inclusive field trip will be taken to Norfolk, Virginia, home of the United States Fleet Forces Command. This field trip will bring all the course objectives into focus and will give the student an opportunity to discuss U.S. Naval Force employment firsthand with fleet sailors.
 

Airpower Strategic Partner

This course examines the strategic contributions and potential of military operations in air, space and cyberspace across the various campaign design phases. The course specifically addresses the mediums of air, space and cyberspace, and cross domain operations. Significant emphasis is placed on the strategic options presented either as a joint contributing force, singular force, or supporting force across the various campaign design phases. Additionally, air, space and cyberspace command and control integrating concepts help tie together the joint aspects of this sub-element of national power. Emerging concepts are then examined, and with the foregoing strategic options analysis, both are used to form a basis for strategic policy development and joint warfighting planning and execution. If possible, the course will include one off-site session at an air power base or institution to gain firsthand experience of strategic level topic discussion. This course qualifies as a warfighting elective.
 
Expeditionary Warfare
This course is designed to acquaint the student officer with joint expeditionary warfare concepts and to discuss their relevance to contingency planning and future warfare. In particular, it provides a more comprehensive study of th e capabilities and limitations of U.S. and allied/coalition expeditionary forces with the aim of educating future joint and combined staff officers and commanders in planning and employment considerations. The course begins with a discussion on what it really means to be “expeditionary” and concludes with an examination of emerging expeditionary warfare concepts. Various expeditionary warfare case studies will facilitate a broadened discussion relative to expeditionary concept and doctrinal developments. This is not just a course for U.S. officers; International Fellows from countries that are now deploying more and more outside their own borders will find this a relevant course.
 
Case Studies in Center of Gravity Determination
This course provides a comprehensive and interdisciplinary assessment of the evolution of the “Center of Gravity” concept from Clausewitz through the present. It enables students to explore varying appreciations of the concept and offers them the opportunity to analyze and determine the center of gravity in contemporary situations. In conducting their analysis students will be supported by an “intelligent agent” and the Learning Agent Laboratory of George Mason University. Students will receive a set of selected references, attend presentations from experts in the field, and participate in seminar discussions in support of their analyses. Student activities will focus on the identification of belligerents’ centers of gravity at the strategic and operational levels of war.
 
American Involvement in Vietnam
This course examines American involvement in Vietnam. It begins with developing an appreciation for the people, culture, and land of Vietnam and progresses through the campaigns and eventual withdrawal of U.S. forces. Emphasis is placed on the development and articulation of U.S. policy and how that policy is implemented, with a focus on the military element of power. Major campaigns are explored down to the operational level of war. Analysis and comparisons between the Vietnam War and ongoing conflicts are explored.
 
International Hot Spots & Military Implications
The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth review of key issues in critical countries or regions of the world where U.S. national security interests can be expected to be engaged in crisis over the next three to five years. The specific countries or regions will be reviewed in the context of the larger geographic area in which they exist, and the focus in each specific region will be on issues that can be expected either to threaten U.S. national security interests or offer opportunities for them to be advanced. So, for example, one such area might be the Caucasus, which would be examined from the perspective of threats to and opportunities for U.S. national security interests and how developments to be anticipated in that region will interrelate with the larger Caspian Basin and Black Sea region. The selection of the focus regions will favor heavily those regions where U.S. military deployments can be expected in the covered timeframe. Student assignments and seminar discussion will cover the U.S. national security interests, anticipated factors that will have a significant effect on those interests, and potential U.S. responses to these factors.
 
Campaign Analysis Course (CAC) II
CAC II provides students a unique opportunity for additional concentrated study in warfighting. Students will examine the strategic and operational art of warfare by studying historical campaigns with a focus on the analysis of joint and combined operations in the period of modern communications and airpower. Specific topics of study will include Maneuver, Strategic Leadership, Intelligence, C2, Adaptation, Logistics, Coalition Warfare, Stabilization/Reconstruction, and COIN. The campaigns addressed will include Poland 1939, Market-Garden 1944, Gallipoli 1915, Inchon 1950, Battle of the Atlantic 1939-1945, Overlord 1944, Philippines 1941-1942, Okinawa 1945, Interwar period 1919-1939, Falklands 1982, OEF 2001-2003, France 1918, Somalia 1992-1993, Japan 1945, Balkans 1990, Algeria 1954-1962, and GWOT 1998-2008. CAC I is not a prerequisite for CAC II; however, students are encouraged to participate in both courses to gain a fuller appreciation of campaigning. Students from all services, branches, agencies, and nations participate in this program. The course will also include a voluntary staff ride to historic sites associated with the 1862 Antietam Campaign (South Mountain; Harpers Ferry; Boteler’s Potomac River Ford; Antietam Battlefield).
 
Joint Warfighting Advanced Studies Program (JWASP)
This is a three-credit elective program designed to provide students with an advanced learning experience in theater-strategic command and operations. This program is expressly designed for those students who expect to hold future key positions on the joint staff or combatant commander staffs. Emphasis will be upon the commander’s roles in theater and multinational strategy development, campaign design, and synchronization and integration across complex (joint and interagency) environments. Through interaction with active and retired senior leaders and faculty SME’s, students will discuss and develop a methodology for understanding the operational environment and propose solutions for the complex challenges facing combatant/joint force commanders. The program includes a campaign planning exercise in which students recommend regional policy based on situation analysis and then conduct the mission analysis portion of the Joint Operational Planning Process based in large part on their own recommended guidance. Additionally, groups will analyze recent applications of operational art and explore “hot spots” where future regional/global conflicts might emerge. JWASP also offers a three lesson “individual study option” in a joint warfighting area of the student’s choice that is tailored to personal interests and professional needs. In all, the program provides an opportunity for talented contemporaries to discuss and explore the traditional and contemporary challenges facing joint commanders.
 
Challenges in Theater Intelligence
This is a three-credit elective program designed to provide students with an advanced learning experience in theater-strategic command and operations. Emphasis will be upon the commander’s roles in theater and multinational strategy development, campaign design, and synchronization and integration across complex (joint and interagency) environments. Through interaction with active and retired senior leaders and faculty SME’s, students will discuss and develop solutions for the complex challenges facing combatant/joint force commanders. The program includes a robust campaign planning exercise where students, acting as commanders, evaluate staff planning/proposed options and provide focusing guidance to drive operational design. Additionally, groups will analyze recent applications of operational art from Grenada to the present and explore “hot spots” where future regional/global conflicts might emerge. JWASP also offers a five lesson “individual study option” in a joint warfighting area of the student’s choice that is tailored to personal interests and professional needs. In all, the program provides an opportunity for talented contemporaries to discuss and explore the traditional and contemporary challenges facing joint commanders.
 
Space Operations for Senior Leaders
This course will provide an understanding of space in support of the warfighter. It will address the space medium, space fundamentals, implications of space law, U.S. and Department of Defense space policies, space systems, space organizations and commands, foreign/commercial space capabilities, and strategic defense planning. Specific focus will include United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) support to Combatant Commanders and Joint Task Force Commanders.
 
European Campaign of 1944-1945
This course provides an overview of respective Allied and German strategy guiding military operations in the European Theater during World War II. It provides a summary of political, strategic, and operational issues facing British, American, Soviet, and German leaders during the period July 1944 through the end of hostilities in May 1945. The class will focus on senior political and military leadership, as well as the development of theater strategy and subordinate operational designs. Topics of study will include Allied Operations Cobra, Market-Garden, Bagration, and German Operation The Watch on the Rhine. Each student will be assigned a key element from the campaign for detailed study and a class presentation.
 
Coalition Warfare: The American Approach to Multinational Operations in the 20th Century
This is a single-elective credit program designed to provide students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of coalition warfare at the strategic and operational levels. Emphasis will be upon the timeless roles of senior leadership in facilitating combined joint strategy formulation and strategic and operational decisionmaking and planning. It will utilize historical analysis to present enduring trends in American approaches to multinational strategy development, campaign design, and synchronization/integration across complex (joint, interagency, and multinational) environments. In addition, students will be provided the opportunity to explore an individual point of interest related to multinational strategy formulation and operations. Issues such as multinational strategic mobilization, industrial mobilization, use of strategic bombing, use of atomic weapons, and challenges of post-conflict reconstruction are open for such investigations.
Command in Future War
This course seeks to educate a select group of students in the challenges associated with commanding U.S. and international forces in future conflict. It will explore the changing nature of war, deriving a mission from vague national and international guidance, developing intuition, and the nuances of accomplishing the agreed upon mission.